Blog

A Living Fence-Hedge: the Pollinator Fedge

A couple years ago, members of the Salvation Army Hope and Unity Community Garden (HUG) in Kitchener, Ontario, were interested in learning some tactics to control populations of cucumber beetle, potato beetle and flea beetle. I discovered that the best defense against so-called pests is healthy, nutritious garden soil. Strategies that increase soil health include composting, mulching, growing cover crops in the fall, rotating plants, and increasing the biodiversity of both plants and animals. The more habitat for insects and birds, the better balanced the growing system. The more perennial...

Why seed saving is so important!

You love to garden! You planted your favourite veggies, herbs and flowers in the spring, watched them sprout, watered them diligently, added compost, weeded and mulched, observed bees pollinating, reaped the harvest, and savoured delicious flavours as you cooked and preserved your bounty. Now the garden season is nearly over - or is it? What about all those seeds? There are many reasons gardeners might want to save seeds, and it's not hard to do once you learn the basics. First of all, here are a few thoughts on why seed saving is so important: a) Adaptated varieties - Saving your own seeds...

Garlic Harvest at Queen's Green Community Garden

This garlic braid contains 150 garlic bulbs that were recently harvested at Queen's Green Community Garden. This garlic was grown in an area about 8 feet by 8 feet. The garlic variety is a soft neck purple garlic that my parents passed on to me about 20 years ago. They grew the same bulbs for about 30 years. The soil was supplemented last fall with free compost from the Region of Waterloo landfill and free manure from the St. Jacobs Livestock Exchange Barns.

Cucumber beetles!

At Rosemount Community garden, we are encountering a host of cucumber beetles which are attacking cucumbers, zucchini, and pumpkins, as well as hollyhocks. We are using a spray made from boiling rhubarb leaves with some dish soap. Small plants can be covered but must be uncovered for pollination. We are blaming the very dry weather, but would welcome any other organic solutions. (Info from planetnatural.com) Submitted by Linda Bluhm, garden co-ordinator

Tree Mobile at Preston Community Garden, Sturdy Park

Greetings Gardeners, We hope you are enjoying your February and getting excited about growing with us this season! We have joined forces with the TreeMobile to be their Cambridge pickup location. TreeMobile is a small volunteer organization that sells fruit trees, shrubs and vines at low prices online with the goal of helping more people grow delicious, affordable and local food in their communities. Cool right? http://www.transitiontreemobile.org/woo-commerce/shop/ The idea here is anyone in Cambridge can order on-line and pickup their plants up at the garden. There is only one scheduled...

Meaningful Connections for Effective Board Leadership

Whether a Change Agent, Challenger, or Cheerleader; the individual personalities within a board create a diverse culture of skills, even when a seemingly difficult individual comes into play. In order to quell issues that may arrive during meetings with inhibitor-types, there must be an element of meaningful team-building to break down any walls that may exist between directors and staff. This will increase communication, comfort levels, and ultimately increase productivity. It is important to note that diversifying your board skill-set can allow for effective leadership when each individual...

Harvest Feast September 13

Hi Folks, I hope you get a chance to savour the flavour of the Harvest Feast booked for 6:00 pm this Sunday at 22 Willow Street Waterloo. I went last year and it was great. Young City Growers teamed up with Chef Jon Rennie to provide a high end plate made from local garden produce. The food was fantastic for the cost! Also, the Multicultural Community Garden Network organised youth entertainment that set the mood. I had the honor of meeting some really interesting people including some political personalities.

Plant an Edible Forest Garden with Mansion Greens!

Mansion Greens Community Garden is pleased to invite you to an edible forest garden planting event on June 6th. It has been our longtime dream to create a food forest/forest garden as an extension of our community garden, and this dream is now becoming a reality! If you're unfamiliar with the concept, forest gardening is a low-maintenance sustainable gardening practice based on woodland ecosystems, that incorporates fruit and nut trees, shrubs, herbs, vines and perennial vegetables. Mansion Greens Community Garden was recently awarded a grant from Tree Canada to install a large forest garden...

BEE-nifits to Creating Bee Friendly Gardens

Every spring over a million beehives are trucked to California to pollinate almond trees for a two week almond bloom. Over many years of this practice, bees have be strongly showing protest and problems are arising. A giant almond pollen party in California where bee colonies are being shipped from all over North America is really just a recipe for a giant disease spreading party. Providing the bees with one type of pollen, while spraying the almond trees with pesticides and getting them to use pollen from genetic engineered crops further results in an unhealthy colony. You may have heard of...

Write your own blog post!

Welcome to the Community Garden Council of Waterloo Region blog! Our hope is that this blog will be used as an opportunity to hear from you, to ask questions, contribute knowledge and share stories about community gardens. We are very excited about using this new tool and hope it will increase collaboration and interaction between community gardeners in Waterloo Region. Stay in touch for topics such as: “What will you grow in your spring garden this year?” “Helpful gardening tips” “Attack of the rabbits and squirrels! What do I do?” “Benefits to Community Gardens: Community Builder, Fresh and...

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